The Horse: Love the Hair!

These Horses Have Better Hair than You.

My hair isn’t always shiny and long, but sometimes it comes out quite nice. These horses, though, have got me all beat and with ease. They’ve never used shampoo or conditioner, and have rarely had a bath. But somehow, their flowing hair and beautiful looks never cease to amaze me. Here are a few gorgeous horses with hair to match.

Friesians 
horses with great hair
Friesians are amazing horses. It’s little wonder that Martha Stewart owns them. 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
This is a mixed Friesian and Dutch Warmblood, a heritage that gives it unique coloring.
horses with great hair

Gypsy Vanner 

horses with great hair
A breed known for long, flowing hair and feathered feet.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

 
Andalusian 
horses with great hair
An extremely beautiful breed of Spanish horses.

Icelandic Horse

horses with great hair
The only horse bred in Iceland, as no horses are allowed in the country. If one leaves, it may never return.
 
Shetland Pony
horses with great hair

These are some of the smallest ponies in the world, but are surprisingly strong and can still be used for riding.

horses with great hair

Clydesdales

horses with great hair
With feathering on their feet and their locks, these are another proud breed.


Appaloosa

horses with great hair

Appaloosas are proof that it’s not all about the mane, and their beautiful spotted coats are what made this breed famous.

Rocky Mountain horses
horses with great hair

A funny name, as this breed actually originated in Kentucky.
 
horses with great hair

Shires

horses with great hair
The tallest horse breed, these are optimal work horses, big and strong.

Norwegian Fjords

horses with great hair

These horses are easy to recognize, as they have a dark strip of hair going down the middle of their mane.

horses with great hair

Halfingers

horses with great hair

A small horse breed that hails from Austria and is barely bigger than a pony.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

Paso Finos

horses with great hair
Their name means ‘fine step’, and this breed is well known for the smoothness of its gait.

Kiger Mustangs

horses with great hair

Descencded from Spanish horses, this breed of mustang is found in Oregon.

Morgan Horses

horses with great hair
One of the oldest breeds on the American continent.

Arabians

horses with great hair

Arabian horses are known for their beauty and uniquness of head shapes.
horses with great hair

A little braiding never hurt anyone’s style.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

Don’t worry little one, you’ll have flowing locks soon enough.
horses with great hair
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The Horse: So you think being a horse rider is easy peasy!

I am so thankful for the person who put this vid together.  I have had so many people throughout my life question the athleticism of doing what I did.  It does take work, conviction, motivation, and determination.  Many time I would be knocked off the horse, through his/her doing, or through my crappy skills at the time.  I even had a horse fall on me, but I got right back up, after swearing some, and got back on the saddle.  Pissed the horse off, but we had an understanding at that point.  She ended up being my bestest horse, and did things like drop me on the tail gate of my truck when I told her to.  This was near the end of my riding career, due to my knee problems. 

But, the point is, she did it, knowing the damn truck alarm was going to go off until I hit the button.  She would also just stop when my knee hurt, and then walk real slow if I had to turn sideways in the saddle.  You must know a horse, ride a horse, tend to horse, to understand the love and bonding of a rider and horse.  

 

The Horse: American Quarter Horse and Pony

Both of my horses were Quarter Horses and nothing compares to them for the western riding I did.  Even the horse which almost ran me off the Grand Canyon was Mustang/Quarter mix.  Wonderful horses. 

 
Breed: American Quarter Horse, Foundation Quarter Horse, Quarter Pony, American Paint Horse

Age: Historic

Place of Origin: United States

Colors: Quarter Horse – any solid color
Quarter Pony – any
Paint Horse – pinto (a.k.a. paint or skewbald and piebald)

Height: Quarter Pony — 11.2-14.2 hh
Quarter Horse — 14.2-15.3 hh
Paint Horse — 14.2-17 hh

Population Status: Common

History: Horse racing was popular wherever horses could be found, and the American colonies were no exception. Due to the lack of racetracks, horses were raced in places such as the center road in town, and these “tracks” were usually only a quarter mile long. Early versions of this racehorse came from the Chickasaw horses and was crossed with Spanish Barbs, English hackneys, Celtic ponies, Florida Crackers, Carolina Tackies, Morgans, and other such horses. The northern colonies called it the short horse; the middle colonies, the quarter-pather; the southern colonies, the quarter horse. Later, Thoroughbreds ended up in quarter horse pedigrees, and vice versa. When American colonists headed west, they took their beloved quarter horses with them, and mustang was soon added to the bloodline. Quarter racing was out of fashion by 1850, but now established in the west, the quarter horse took up the new role of cowpony. The American Quarter Horse Association was founded in 1940. They originally did not register pinto horses or horses under 14.2 hh, but Thoroughbred blood is routinely added to the bloodline. (First generation Quarter/Thoroughbred crosses are put in the AQHA appendix and called Appendix Quarter Horses.) The Foundation Quarter Horse Association was founded in 1994 to register Quarter horses without additional Thoroughbred blood. The American Paint Horse Association was founded in 1965 to register pinto-colored Quarter horses and, later, also pinto-colored Thoroughbreds and Appendix Quarters. Different Quarter pony organizations have been made to register Quarter horses under 14.2 hands. The International Quarter Pony Association, founded in 2005, also registers Paint ponies, Appaloosas, Ponies of the Americas, or any pony of approved Quarter-type body. The Quarter horse is the most popular breed in the United States and the third most popular in the world.

Characteristics: Quarters and Paints usually stand 14.2-15.3 hh but can be bigger or smaller. They are often well-muscled and compact with large hindquarters, stifles, and gaskins, and a short neck, but build varies greatly in type. The neck should always join the shoulder at a near-45-degree angle. They have fine, straight heads; small ears; wide-set eyes; firm mouths; sloped shoulders and croups; short, strong back; solid, well-muscled legs; strong joints and tendons; deep, broad chests; short cannons; small, strong, oblong hooves; and deep, open heels. The hocks are low-set and well underneath the body. These sprinter horses are the fastest horses in the world; the fastest recorded speed was 55 mph. They often do not have much endurance but plenty of strength, speed, and a keen “cow sense.” These are calm, intelligent, and agile horses of good balance.

Types: Quarters may be American Quarter horses, Foundation Quarter horses, Paint horses, or Quarter ponies. There are four body types. The two “bulldog” types are the stock/Foundation type – weedy, wiry, and tough with short necks and a mustang form – and the halter type – a little larger and much more heavily muscled with a long, arched neck, a small head, and small feet. The two “Thoroughbred” or “progressive” types are the racing type – lean and long-legged with muscular hindquarters and legs – and the hunter type – slimmer and resembles a Thoroughbred more than it resembles a halter type. Even among the types, great variety exists in this breed. Palominos, whites, pintos, buckskins, and brindles may register with their respective color breeds.

Uses: Depending on type, quarters tend to be athletic and versatile. They are used in racing at 300 yards to a quarter mile, constantly excel at all Western events, and are nice trail horses, but some Western events they are popular in, such as calf roping and bronco riding, are considered inhumane by many. Most types are also capable of most other horse riding sports, including jumping, dressage, and pony games. They are often used for ranch work. It is ill-advised to jump a halter-type Quarter, as their hooves are often too small for their bulky body. They are also perfectly capable of being harness horses but do not excel in this.