24 Stunning Reasons to Visit Scotland

1. Quiraing, Isle of Skye
scotland landscapes
2. Glenfinnan viaduct, Glenfinnan, near Fort William
scotland landscapes
3. Kilchurn castle, Loch awe, Argyll and Bute
scotland landscapes
4. Glencoe
scotland landscapes
5. Quiraing
scotland landscapes
6. Shetland ponies, Shetland
scotland landscapes
7. Fingals cave, Isle of Staffa, Inner Hebrides
scotland landscapes
8. Ballachulish & Loch Leven, Lochaber
scotland landscapes
9. Bluebells in Perthshire, possibly murthly?
scotland landscapes
10. The old man of Storr, Isle of Skye
scotland landscapes
11. Dunnottar Castle, Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire
scotland landscapes
12. Somewhere in North Western Scotland
scotland landscapes
13. Finnich Glen, Loch Lomond 
scotland landscapes
14. Loch Chon
scotland landscapes
15. Black Cuillins of the Isle of Skye
scotland landscapes
16. Quiraing, Isle of Skye
scotland landscapes
17. Kilt Rock, Isle of Skye
scotland landscapes
18. Glencoe in the morning 
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19. Northwestern Scotland
scotland landscapes
20. The hermitage, Dunkeld, Perthshire (I think)
scotland landscapes
21. Carrbridge, Aviemore
scotland landscapes
22. Staffa
scotland landscapes
23. Isle of Skye, Old man of Storr
scotland landscapes
24. Glenfinnan 
scotland landscapes

The Horse: Love the Hair!

These Horses Have Better Hair than You.

My hair isn’t always shiny and long, but sometimes it comes out quite nice. These horses, though, have got me all beat and with ease. They’ve never used shampoo or conditioner, and have rarely had a bath. But somehow, their flowing hair and beautiful looks never cease to amaze me. Here are a few gorgeous horses with hair to match.

Friesians 
horses with great hair
Friesians are amazing horses. It’s little wonder that Martha Stewart owns them. 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
This is a mixed Friesian and Dutch Warmblood, a heritage that gives it unique coloring.
horses with great hair

Gypsy Vanner 

horses with great hair
A breed known for long, flowing hair and feathered feet.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

 
Andalusian 
horses with great hair
An extremely beautiful breed of Spanish horses.

Icelandic Horse

horses with great hair
The only horse bred in Iceland, as no horses are allowed in the country. If one leaves, it may never return.
 
Shetland Pony
horses with great hair

These are some of the smallest ponies in the world, but are surprisingly strong and can still be used for riding.

horses with great hair

Clydesdales

horses with great hair
With feathering on their feet and their locks, these are another proud breed.


Appaloosa

horses with great hair

Appaloosas are proof that it’s not all about the mane, and their beautiful spotted coats are what made this breed famous.

Rocky Mountain horses
horses with great hair

A funny name, as this breed actually originated in Kentucky.
 
horses with great hair

Shires

horses with great hair
The tallest horse breed, these are optimal work horses, big and strong.

Norwegian Fjords

horses with great hair

These horses are easy to recognize, as they have a dark strip of hair going down the middle of their mane.

horses with great hair

Halfingers

horses with great hair

A small horse breed that hails from Austria and is barely bigger than a pony.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

Paso Finos

horses with great hair
Their name means ‘fine step’, and this breed is well known for the smoothness of its gait.

Kiger Mustangs

horses with great hair

Descencded from Spanish horses, this breed of mustang is found in Oregon.

Morgan Horses

horses with great hair
One of the oldest breeds on the American continent.

Arabians

horses with great hair

Arabian horses are known for their beauty and uniquness of head shapes.
horses with great hair

A little braiding never hurt anyone’s style.
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair
 
horses with great hair

Don’t worry little one, you’ll have flowing locks soon enough.
horses with great hair

I want out!!!

Half of people living in Illinois and Connecticut want to get the hell out

Updated by Danielle Kurtzleben on April 30, 2014, 6:15 p.m. ET danielle@vox.com

 

Not every Chicagoan is as happy as this kid. Half of Illinoisans say they’d get out if they could. Getty Images
Arizona Diamondbacks v Chicago Cubs

 

New data is out on the states people want to leave, and it’s tailor-made to troll all your Facebook friends from Illinois and the northeastern Amtrak corridor.

Gallup asked people around the country whether they would move away from their states, given the chance. As it turns out, half of Illinois residents and 49 percent of all Connecticutians (Connecticutese? Connecticuters?) want to change states. In addition, it looks like a good chunk of the northeastern seaboard is just itching to pack up a U-Haul.

2014-04-29_State_Residents_Desire_Move

Montanans, Hawaiians, and Mainers are least likely to say they’d want to leave, with fewer than one-quarter of those residents saying they’d move. Altogether, only 33 percent of all Americans surveyed said they’d leave their current states.

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Meanwhile, in nine states, 40 percent or more of the people want to get out, including around half of all Illinoisans, Marylanders, and Connecticuterians. [Notice Nevada has about 43% of residents who would leave if they could.  Since they didn’t ask me, I am going to just add my vote making it 44%.  I want out so bad!]d66rflbvvekyrhafbifjdw__1_

 

It’s fascinating data, and if you’re from the relatively content upper plains, you can feel comfortably superior. If you’re from one of those dark green states, you can shake your fist at the sky in anguish.

Or you can just, you know, get out.

All these people say they would leave if they could, but far fewer actually will, which might in a certain sense be good — imagine the epic moving-box and bubble-wrap shortage if one-third of all Americans moved to a new state.

But only six percent of all people said they were either very or extremely likely to change states in the next year, and even that is higher than the number of people who will likely move. That share of people who as of July 2013 were in a different state from a year ago was around 1.5 percent.

That’s a much lower share than it used to be. Interstate migration has fallen in a big way over the last twenty years. A 2013 paper from the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis showed this.

Screen_Shot_2014-04-30_at_4_02_25_PM

Thanks to those unsightly gaps, the chart isn’t perfect, but it clearly shows that the gross interstate migration rate — the black line showing the share of the US population that shifted from state to state in any given year — fell by roughly half, from almost 3 percent to around 1.5 percent, between 1990 and 2011.

Americans have stopped changing states, and that may be a very bad thing. During and just after the recession, the ever-dropping moving rate made everyone wring their hands: a collapsed housing market and a profound lack of jobs both contributed to and resulted from a lack of migration.

When there are no jobs anywhere, after all, people have less of a reason to move. And when the housing market is stagnant, people can’t go get the jobs that do happen to pop up. In other words, the would-be factory worker who can’t sell her house in Memphis to move to Cincinnati, where there are jobs, can’t get that job and spend that paycheck and create more jobs. Or maybe that person just wants to wait for housing prices to pick back up again before selling.

Because of this, it could be both a promising sign and an economic booster if Americans start to move more; notably, a lot of the states people say they’d least like to leave also have low jobless rates, and people who would most like to leave are often in states where the jobless rate is high.

Plus, among Americans who say they plan to leave their states, the most common reason given was work- or business-related — a reason given by 31 percent of respondents. Different states, however, had different mixes of reasons; New York, Illinois, and Maryland residents all cited taxes as a key reason. New York and Connecticut residents were also significantly more likely to cite a high cost of living.

All that said, there’s another story about why people are staying put, and it’s not about recessions. After all, the decline in mobility started way before the recession. Rather, it may be all about a more homogeneous US economy, not to mention the internet and cheap travel.

The economists who made that above chart, Greg Kaplan and Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, argued that the decline in moving in part happened because US jobs got less geographically specific, as they put it. Translated, that means it’s easier than it used to be to find a lot of the same sorts of jobs across a lot of different cities, as the Economist noted in 2012. A shift away from the goods-producing sector to services has helped this happen. Common services jobs, like healthcare and waitressing, can be done anywhere. But a lot of goods-producing jobs (manufacturing, mining, logging) have to be done in particular places (i.e. wherever the factories, mines, or trees are).

Likewise, there’s now more fluid information. People can easily look up places they might want to live. This could also be a factor that keeps people in place — they can research and hem and haw over a move, rather than crossing their fingers and driving across the country.

All of which may mean that even if Illinoisans and Connectici and really anyone else is just sick of their state, they’re less likely to do anything about it than they were 20 years ago. The question of whether that’s a good or bad thing remains a mystery.

Proud dads! A funny.

The Proud Fathers…

Four men went golfing one day. Three of them headed to the first tee and the fourth went into the clubhouse to take care of the bill.

The three men started talking and bragging about their sons.

The first man told the others, “My son is a home builder, married, and he is so successful that he gave a friend a new home for free. Just gave it to him!”

The second man said, “My son was a car salesman, married, and now he owns a multi-line dealership. He’s so successful that he gave one of his friends a new Mercedes, fully loaded.”

The third man, not wanting to be outdone, bragged, “My son is a stockbroker, married, and he’s doing so well that he gave his friend an entire portfolio.”

father
The fourth man joined them on the tee after a few minutes of taking care of business. The first man mentioned, “We were just talking about our sons. How is yours doing?”

The fourth man replied, “Well, my son is a bachelor, gay and he go-go dances in a club.” The other three men grew silent as he continued, “I’m not totally thrilled about the dancing job, but he must be doing well. His last three boyfriends gave him a house, a brand new Mercedes, and a stock portfolio!”

“THE TRUTH ABOUT LONG HAIR”

 

 

This information about hair has been hidden from the public since the Vietnam War. Our culture leads people to believe that hair style is a matter of personal preference, that hair style is a matter of fashion and/or convenience, and that how people wear their hair is simply a cosmetic issue. Back in the Vietnam war, however, an entirely different picture emerged, one that has been carefully covered up and hidden from public view.

In the early nineties, Sally [name changed to protect privacy] was married to a licensed psychologist who worked at a VA medical hospital. He worked with combat veterans with PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder. Most of them had served in Vietnam. Sally said, “I remember clearly an evening when my husband came back to our apartment on Doctor’s Circle carrying a thick official looking folder in his hands. Inside were hundreds of pages of certain studies commissioned by the government. He was in shock from the contents. What he read in those documents completely changed his life. From that moment on my conservative, middle-of-the-road husband grew his hair and beard and never cut them again. What is more, the VA Medical Center let him do it, and other very conservative men in the staff followed his example.

As I read the documents, I learned why. It seems that during the Vietnam War, special forces in the war department had sent undercover experts to comb American Indian Reservations looking for talented scouts, for tough young men trained to move stealthily through rough terrain. They were especially looking for men with outstanding, almost supernatural tracking abilities. Before being approached, these carefully selected men were extensively documented as experts in tracking and survival. With the usual enticements, the well-proven smooth phrases used to enroll new recruits, some of these Indian trackers were then enlisted.

Once enlisted, an amazing thing happened. Whatever talents and skills they had possessed on the reservation seemed to mysteriously disappear, as recruit after recruit failed to perform as expected in the field. Serious causalities and failures of performance led the government to contract expensive testing of these recruits, and this is what was found. When questioned about their failure to perform as expected, the older recruits replied consistently that when they received their required military haircuts, they could no longer ‘sense’ the enemy, they could no longer access a ‘sixth sense,’ their ‘intuition’ no longer was reliable, they couldn’t ‘read’ subtle signs as well or access subtle extrasensory information.

So the testing institute recruited more Indian trackers, let them keep their long hair, and tested them in multiple areas. Then they would pair two men together who had received the same scores on all the tests. They would let one man in the pair keep his hair long, and gave the other man a military haircut. Then the two men retook the tests. Time after time the man with long hair kept making high scores. Time after time, the man with the short hair failed the tests in which he had previously scored high scores.

Here is a Typical Test: The recruit is sleeping out in the woods. An armed ‘enemy’ approaches the sleeping man. The long haired man is awakened out of his sleep by a strong sense of danger and gets away long before the enemy is close, long before any sounds from the approaching enemy are audible. In another version of this test, the long haired man senses an approach and somehow intuits that the enemy will perform a physical attack. He follows his ‘sixth sense’ and stays still, pretending to be sleeping, but quickly grabs the attacker and ‘kills’ him as the attacker reaches down to strangle him. This same man, after having passed these and other tests, then received a military haircut and consistently failed these tests, and many other tests that he had previously passed.

So the document recommended that all Indian trackers be exempt from military haircuts. In fact, it required that trackers keep their hair long. The mammalian body has evolved over millions of years. Survival skills of human and animal at times seem almost supernatural.

Science is constantly coming up with more discoveries about the amazing abilities of man and animal to survive. Each part of the body has highly sensitive work to perform for the survival and well being of the body as a whole. The body has a reason for every part of itself. Hair is an extension of the nervous system, it can be correctly seen as exteriorized nerves, a type of highly evolved ‘feelers’ or ‘antennae’ that transmit vast amounts of important information to the brain stem, the limbic system, and the neocortex. Not only does hair in people, including facial hair in men, provide an information highway reaching the brain, hair also emits energy, the electromagnetic energy emitted by the brain into the outer environment. This has been seen in Kirlian photography when a person is photographed with long hair and then rephotographed after the hair is cut. When hair is cut, receiving and sending transmissions to and from the environment are greatly hampered. This results in numbing out. Cutting of hair is a contributing factor to unawareness of environmental distress in local ecosystems. It is also a contributing factor to insensitivity in relationships of all kinds. It contributes to sexual frustration.

Conclusion: In searching for solutions for the distress in our world, it may be time for us to consider that many of our most basic assumptions about reality are in error. It may be that a major part of the solution is looking at us in the face each morning when we see ourselves in the mirror. The story of Samson and Delilah in the Bible has a lot of encoded truth to tell us. When Delilah cut Samson’s hair, the once undefeatable Samson was defeated.

Reported by C. Young (Via United Truth Seekers)